Introduction

This digest has two aims.  

The first is to cover in depth, without being too technical, advances in our knowledge, equipment and techniques that I hope will be of interest to all amateur astronomers.

The second is to add to the content of the books recently published by Cambridge University Press and so keep them up fully up to date.

Monthly Night Sky Guide

The author also writes a guide to each month’s northern hemisphere night sky.  Just click here:  Monthly Night Sky Guide

Recent Pages added to the Digest  

Most recent:  The Cff Telescopes 127 mm, f/7, refractor – a world class telescope

 Choosing the sensor size of a deep sky imaging astro camera

Imaging M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, from an urban location – Bortle class 5.

Imaging the Moon in daylight

Thoughts about my refractor telescopes

ASTAP – An excellent stacking program

The Celestron 9.25 inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope   

 (An update including the use of the Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer.)

Imaging the Dumbell Nebula, M27, and the Ring Nebula, M57, with a Celestron 9.25 Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope

Imaging Meteor Showers (2): capturing meteors from video sequences

Imaging Meteors (1) : the Classic Method

An in-depth processing tutorial imaging the Veil Nebula

Imaging the Northern Milky Way – Using Siril

A constellation image taken using a tripod mounted APS-C DSLR and then processed using Sequator and Siril

8 inch Aperture Telescopes part 3 – Maksutovs and other Catadioptric Telescopes.

8 inch Aperture Telescopes part 2 – Schmidt-Cassegrains

8 inch Aperture Telescopes part 1 – telescopes using only mirrors.

Using an astro camera as a webcam to image the Moon

Sensor Resolution and Image Sampling.

The ZWO ASIAIR Plus

A Webcam Based Collimation Tool

The Ritchey-Chrétien Telescope for amateurs  (a major update)

The ‘500’ rule for imaging on a fixed tripod

Imaging the Gemini Constellation

The Orion Constellation imaged using a fixed tripod

Binning, Dithering and Drizzling

 

I would like to dedicate this website to Rod Mollise whose posts in ‘Uncle Rod’s Astro Blog’  have, for many years, been a source of great inspiration for me.

Ian Morison FRAS is an astronomer and astrophysicist who served as the 35th Gresham Professor of Astronomy.   Though a radio astronomer by profession, now in his 57th year at the Jodrell Bank Observatory of the University of Manchester, he has been a keen amateur optical astronomer since making his first simple telescope with lenses given to him by his optician when 11 or 12.  In 1990 he helped found the Macclesfield Astronomy Society of which he is now patron and he is a past president of the UK’s Society for Popular Astronomy,  now acting as its Instrument and Imaging Advisor.   He writes a regular ‘Telescope Topics’ column for ‘Popular Astronomy’ and has made many contributions to the ‘Sky at Night’ and ‘Astronomy Now’ magazines.

His books published by Cambridge University Press are shown below and all can be purchased from Blackwell’s, just search for ‘Ian Morison’. 

A book aimed to bridge the gap between books for beginners and the specialised books about individual practical astronomy topics.

A book based on the author’s Gresham lectures on Astronomy.

A book covering all aspects of Astrophotography.

[The opening image is of the galaxy M33 in Triangulum.   It was taken remotely using an ASA 8-inch Newtonian Astrograph located in Spain.  The data acquisition and image processing used to achieve this image are described both in ‘An Amateurs Guide…’ and ‘The Art of Astrophotography’.]